When I Say “Groovy” or “Clojure”, I Mean “Groovy” or “Clojure”

Two languages that I am looking at these days (and would eventually like to work in) are Groovy and Clojure.

There is a site called Find Grails Jobs. Most of them are for jobs for which you would code in Groovy and/or in Grails.

But there are a few that are really Java jobs. They will mention a lot of Java technologies, and Groovy is mentioned as a “nice to have” way at the bottom. Are some firms hoping you will sneak Groovy into a Java shop? Or are they trying to pull a bit of a bait and switch? I think it might be the latter. I like Java, but I would prefer doing Groovy. If I want a Java job, I will look on a site about Java jobs.

There is no site devoted to Clojure jobs, but there is one called Functional Jobs. They have jobs for a lot of functional languages. So much for purity.

One ad said (and this is a direct quote): If you’re interested in functional languages like Scala, Swift, Erlang, Clojure, F#, Lisp, Haskell, and OCaml, then you’ll enjoy learning Flow.

First off: I tried googling a few combinations of “Flow”, “programming”, “language” and “software”. I could not find a page that appeared to be a home page for a language called “Flow”. I did find a few pages about “flow-based programming“, which I guess is like Dataflows in GPars.

But more to the point: If I am interested in Clojure, don’t tell me that I am interested in some other language that only exists at your company. If you feel that some obscure language is the best way to deliver your products, fine. But don’t tell me what I want. You decided to jump down the rabbit hole. You deal with it.

You’re welcome.